Learning Components for Human Sensing

November 3, 2011 at 12:00 pm by

Place: Large Lecture Room – CVC
Affiliation: Component Analysis Laboratory, and the Human Sensing Laboratory. Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburg. USA

 

Enabling computers to understand human behavior has the potential to revolutionize many areas that benefit society such as clinical diagnosis, human computer interaction, and social robotics. A critical element in the design of any behavioral sensing system is to find a good representation of the data for encoding, segmenting, classifying and predicting subtle human behavior. In this talk I will propose several extensions of Component Analysis (CA) techniques (e.g. kernel principal component analysis, support vector machines, and spectral clustering) that are able to learn spatio-temporal representations or components useful in many human sensing tasks.  In the first part of the talk I will give an overview of several ongoing projects in the CMU Human Sensing Laboratory, including our current work on depression assessment from video, as well as hot-flash detection from wearable sensors. In the second part of the talk I will show how several extensions of the CA methods outperform state-of-the-art algorithms in problems such as temporal alignment of human behavior, temporal segmentation/clustering of human activities, joint segmentation and classification of human behavior, and facial feature detection in images. The talk will be adaptive, and I will discuss the topics of major interest to the audience.

 

ca.cs.cmu.edu

 

Watch the Video Presentation